Digital Media Campaigns: Just Like Old-Timey Storefront Marketing?

Lee Larson
June 28, 2017

Is building a digital media campaign really any different than an old-timey storefront? Let’s compare!

Blueprint

In order to arrive with actable takeaways, keeping the end in mind at the beginning of digital campaign planning is crucial. Identifying marketing objectives with measurable key performance indicators draws the blueprint, and all campaign elements should be built to specifications.

Foundation

You invested in the real estate – in this case, it’s your website, social media pages and any other digital assets you’ve constructed. Make sure they are sound, inspected and aligned with your future plans. These set the foundation for which the entire campaign will be built upon.

Windows

The windows are your “push” tactics, like banner ads and auto-play video. It’s when your customers are walking by on the sidewalk and something catches their eye and gives them a positive first impression.

Doors

Doors are gateways to the world beyond your own. They are your “pull” efforts of the campaign. You invite customers in through a value proposition that convinces them to see more. Often, this is through intriguing content or search ads where you have interested customers and need to guide them in.

Interior

The wall decor and furniture matter. The customers are in your store – what do you want them to do when they watch that video, click that link or read that article? Does the place on your website where they land make sense with what got them there? For example, if a customer thinks he is going to watch a video about smart buying processes in a down ag economy, and you take him to a salesy product page, he’s likely going to turn around and grumpily walk out the door. This is commonly referred to as a “bad brand experience.”

Maintenance

Your content gets old and dusty, and customers grow tired of looking at the same thing all the time. Clean, refresh, optimize and continually provide value to keep loyal customers coming back. Change the flickering light bulbs for those who fit your target audience but haven’t set foot in your door yet.

Measure Success

Analyze what matters. If you have a lot of traffic but not a lot of conversions, explore why. Assess what kind of customers are coming in the door, and then go out and find customers that look like the ones that do convert. Do more of what works; do less of what doesn’t. Overall, make sure what you are measuring aligns with the objectives, key performance indicators and makes sense with the tactics you are using. Use consistent, concise and clear reporting to guide you.

The tactics, avenues and customer journeys may change; but the principals of digital campaigns are the same as any other type of marketing. Tell a good story, engage new customers and give them a reason to keep coming back.

Paulsen Helps Make the Stockyards Ag Experience Come to Life

Alltech Ad Gets High Marks in Readership Study

Engagement